Monochrome Breach – An Exhibition of Drawings – Bank Street Arts – June 16th/17th

earthly-delights-72dpiOn the evening of Friday 16th June – after a symposium an Art + Copyright/Copyleft – there will be an opening for a one-day show of my drawings at Bank Street Arts in Sheffield. More here.

I will be giving an artist talk during the evening event on the 16th. Entrance to this event and the exhibition is free and all are welcome.

The evening event if from about 5pm on June 16th. I will be talking about the work at the start of this event.

The gallery is open on the 17th between 11am and 4pm.

All the works are for sale (unframed). 50% of any money raised will be donated to Bank Street Arts.

In addition to this ALL the money raised from the auction of my drawing of Guernica will go to Bank Street Arts. If you would like to bid for this drawing please email in confidence at bryaneccleshall@gmail.com. The drawing will go to the highest bidder over the reserve price of £1500.

Large works to be shown include:

  • After Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights (pictured above)
  • After Pablo Picasso’s Guernica (pictured below)
  • After Caravaggio’s The Incredulity of St Thomas
  • After Walker Evans’ and Sherrie Levine’s Annie Mae Burroughs
  • After Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa
  • After Joseph Beuys’ Wirstschaftswerte (Economic Values) II

guernica72dpifinshed

There will also be a selection of smaller works on display. All the works are drawings of art works by others.

A PDF of a catalogue/ price list is available for download here.

I hope to see you there.

New Drawing: After Francisco Zurbarán’s ‘The Martyrdom of Saint Serapion’

 

After Zurbaran
After Francisco Zurbarán’s The Martyrdom of Saint Serapion (Graphite on four paper panels, 420mm x 420mm)

This will be on show at the forthcoming pop-up exhibition of my drawings at Bank Street Arts in Sheffield on Saturday 16th June. It will be for sale, but I’ve not quite worked out the prices yet…

For Sale: Digital Rain Prints… £3 each

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If you would like to buy a Digital Rain collection of your own making, now’s your chance.The headline is that I’m offering 250+ designs for £3 each with no minimum order. Order as few or as many designs as you like. The image above gives you an indication of what they look like.

To get hold of these you need to email me [bryaneccleshall (at) gmail (dot) com] and I’ll send you an order form or you can download it here: Digital Rain Order Form

Once you’ve filled it in, email it to me and I’ll get on with the order.

Thanks for reading and thanks for your continuing support.

 

For Sale: Twelve A2 prints of ‘The Digital Rain Gallery of the Louvre’

Digital Rain of the Louvre

I am selling twelve A2 prints of the above image The Digital Rain Gallery of the Louvre for £30 plus p+p. If you would like one, please email me at bryaneccleshall (at) gmail (dot) com and I’ll put you on the list. First come, first served. I’ll ship anywhere in the world and can accept Paypal.

Form an orderly queue…

For Sale: After Pablo Picasso’s ‘Guernica’

guernica72dpifinshed
After Pablo Picasso’s ‘Guernica’

I have decided to offer my large multi-panel drawing for sale with all the proceeds of that sale going to Bank Street Arts in Sheffield. Bank Street Arts is a multi-disciplinary arts centre where I have have been a resident artist and trustee for several years. You can read more about the centre here.

The sale will take place as part of a solo show of my monochrome works at Bank Street Arts on the 16th and 17th June. If you’re interested in buying the work it will be offered unframed with a reserve price of £1500. We have to sort out the details, but basically the highest bid over £1500 made by the close of the show will secure the piece.

Some details:

  • Size: 2400mm x 1200mm.
  • Assembled from 144 square panels, with slight mismatches visible throughout the work. Click on the image above for a much closer look.
  • Graphite on Paper.
  • Unframed.

The drawing will be on display during the exhibition, which we plan to run in conjunction with a symposium on copyright. If you are interested in attending the symposium, you can find the details here. On that page is a call-out for twenty-minute papers, for which the deadline is May 15th.

If you can’t make it to the show but are interested in placing a bid for the work, please let me know (my email address is bryaneccleshall (at) gmail (dot) com) and we’ll see what can be arranged.

I will post much, more about the solo show in due course, but I wanted to make this announcement as soon as possible.

A Summary of Work…

It’s been a while since I last posted anything on here. That’s not because I’ve nothing to say, but because I’ve been busy with all sorts of stuff. I thought I’d take a few minutes to summarise my practice at the moment with a few links to where it can be seen and to bookmark a few posts on this blog that keep getting hits…

  • Digital Rain
    • While I am still making monochrome pencil drawings I have been working on a series of digital collages that I impulsively called Digital Rain. I did post them on here to begin with, but I was making two or three a day and it was turning into a chore. I have revived by instagram account which is probably the best place to see them. I also post them on twitter, but mixed in with all sorts of other stuff. A couple of recent images sit at the head of this post. The work emerges form the Sans Terre work I make with Chris Graham and is concerned with refugees, art history, Beyoncé, dystopian science-fiction, religion, and loads more. I’m not thinking too hard when I make individual pieces as I see them as being in conversation with one another and what is clear in one piece is muddy in another. They are yet to be exhibited.
  • Radio Four Appearance
    • A couple of weeks ago I was interviewed for a BBC Radio Four programme about copyright. It can be listened to through the BBC iPlayer on this page. I’m on close to the end, but it’s a fascinating meditation on the fitness of copyright law (or rather the lack of it) in the digital age. Recommended, even if I had nothing to do with it. Listen here. In the programme Richard Taylor refers to my prize-winning drawing, After Joseph Beuys’s Wirtschaftswerte (Economic Values). You can read more about it here and see it below.

After Joseph Beuys Wirtschaftswerte II

  • 365 Project Advice
    • My advice for starting a 365 drawing project keeps getting referred to and you can find it here.
  • Antoine Berman’s Twelve Deforming Tendencies of Translation
    • The most popular post I’ve ever written is this one, concerned with the text that was the course of my Ph.D. research. I suspect that people click on and then click off. I probably ought to expand it. I will be writing a version of my findings as a chapter of a book. That’s likely to be the reason I disappear from view in June and July.

 

 

 

 

Critical Distance: Aleppo Kids 1 + 2

The image on the left – of a young boy crouching and sheltering his even younger sister in Aleppo – did the rounds on social media a few months ago. It was soon outdone by the picture of the poor lad looking bewildered in an Aleppo hospital, but it it hit me quite hard. I have a younger sister and it made me wonder how I might have reacted in similar circumstances. I am grateful that I’ve never been tested in this way. It was soon followed by the image on the right of a shell-shocked child in an Aleppo hospital

Each drawing is 1.26 m x 1.26m, graphite on paper. It was a much quicker process to make these than previous large works. I edited the photographs in PhotoShop. In doing so each section became quite blurred and so when I was working it wasn’t clear what I was actually drawing. When assembled the image reveals itself.

When Chris Graham and I made the first Sans Terre/+ installation I printed out large pixellated versions of photographs of charred corpses. Seen close up, they didn’t make much sense, but from across a room the pixels coalesced to form recognisably human shapes. It struck us that this was a manifestation (it seemed to concrete to be a metaphor) of how drone-centred foreign interventions take place. From a long distance things seem simple and clear, but close up – on the ground, as it were  – it’s messier and less clear. Making this drawing in a fragmented unclear way that, when put together, re-enacts some of that experience. I’ll be honest, it’s very muddled at the moment, but there’s something very real about distance and comprehension. It’s usual to talk about ‘critical distance’ in contemporary art practice, but I wonder if we really know what that means. It’s easy to subscribe to an oppositional ideology that is unlikely to ever manifest itself.